PROFILE-PICS-CIRCLE-KEVIN

Almost always, my research for “History Matters” yields a whole lot more photos, documents, newspaper clippings, and other items than those that appear in the Laurel Leader. This page gives me an opportunity to share all the items uncovered in my research. After the images, you’ll find a link to the story on the Baltimore Sun/Laurel Leader web site. Don’t forget to return here after reading the story!

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July 23, 2016

History of the Laurel Theater

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leader-link-part1leader-link-part2Like everyone else who grew up in Laurel during the 1960s and 70s, I spent a lot of time at the Laurel Theater on Main Street. Those were the days when we would sit through two showings and hope the usher didn’t kick us out (which they never did). For me, the theater took on a personal note when the Petrucci family bought the theater and turned it into a dinner theater (Jo Petrucci is my sister-in-law.)

But, as I found out, the history of the building revealed that the theater had been one of the town’s most important landmarks to the citizens of Laurel for decades.

I interviewed some very helpful people, including Robert Headley, who wrote a book titled Motion Picture Exhibition in Washington, D.C. His book was invaluable in researching the original Red Wing Theater as well as the Laurel Theater. It turns out that Driver is a retired professor from the University of Maryland and still lives in the area. He graciously invited Rich and I to his house and talked for an entire afternoon with us.

An unexpected source was George Prior, a classmate of mine at Laurel High School (Class of 1972). Even though I’d known George very well for a long time, I never knew his father managed the theater for years. I met up with George and Mark O’Dell, another LHS alumnus who worked for George’s father while he was in high school, and listened to their stories.

I talked to Thom Jarrell, who worked for years for the Petrucci family in a variety of jobs. Thom had lots of stories about the building, including the story of the ghost he saw. And, of course, my sister-in-law Jo provided a wealth of information and photos about the building.

As I was finishing my research for the story, the Laurel History Boys were contacted by Blaine Sutton, from SORTO Contracting Company. SORTO had been awarded the contract to demolish the building and Blaine wondered if we would be interested in checking it out one last time. Would we? As we picked our way through the debris littering the interior of the dilapidated theater, it was both fascinating and sad. Through my research I had acquired an appreciation for what the theater had meant to the town during its heyday, but on that last inspection all we saw was a building falling apart at the seams. The saddest sight of all was the old movie screen hanging in tatters. How many movies were projected onto that screen, starting with silent movies in the 1920s?

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The Red Wing Theater was at 717 Washington Boulevard, labeled “Electric Theater” in this Sanborn Insurance map from 1914. Source: Dr. Robert Headley.
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This program for the Red Wing Theater is from 1924. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
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Moving Picture World, one of the first trade papers in the new motion picture business, contained information and brief editorial comments about what movies played where. The June 1924 edition described what was playing at Laurel. Source: http://www.mediahistoryproject.org.
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In this March 4, 1909 photo looking south on Washington Boulevard, the front of the Red Wing Theater can be seen at the top left. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
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After the Red Wing Theater burned down, Laurel residents Mr. & Mrs. B.E. Chapman announced they would build a replacement theater. Source: Laurel Leader.
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Progress was reported but there were no more announcements about the Chapmans’ venture after this. Source: Laurel Leader.
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Sidney Lust already had an empire of theaters in the Washington area before he built the Laurel Theater. His company controlled film distribution rights from Maryland to Texas. Source: Dr. Robert Headley.

 

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Built in 1947, Sidney Lust’s Beltsville Drive-in was a landmark for Laurel residents, especially teenagers. Source: http://www.driveins.org.
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When the Petrucci family converted the building into a dinner theater, major renovations, including the facade, were undertaken. This photo is before it reopened as Petrucci’s Dinner Theater. Source: Dr. Robert Headley.
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Dr. Robert Headley being interviewed. Photo by Richard Friend.
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This 1931 photo of the Laurel Theater shows the two storefronts on either side of the theater entrance, which had not yet been rented. The windows on the second floor were apartments for rent. The blurry poster in the middle resting on the sidewalk is advertising Charlie Chaplin’s “City Lights,” which was released in 1931. Source: Paul Sanchez.
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These 1934 photos show some changes to the theater. The “LAUREL” neon sign has been added and a barbershop is now occupying one of the storefronts. The globe lights hanging from the façade have been removed. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
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This article from 1975 shows the marquee on the building’s front that was changed a few times over the years. Also visible is the TV repair shop that occupied the storefront to the right of the theater entrance. Source: Laurel News Leader.
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This is a 1936 lobby card from the Laurel Theater. Source: Peter and Martha (Kalbach) Lewnes collection.
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In an attempt to improve business, owner Donald Richie tried screening X-Rated movies. Source: Laurel News Leader.
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In 1976, the final movie shown by Ritchie was Shampoo, starring Warren Beatty. After that the marquee read “Closed Forever.” Source: Laurel News Leader.
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This 1989 photo shows the remodeled façade. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
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The Petrucci family gutted the interior of the theater before remodeling. Source: Jo Leonard.
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The Petrucci family reopened the theater and offered first-run movies. The grand re-opening offered the blockbuster “Jaws.” Source: Jo Leonard.
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The Petrucci family renovated the theater, removing the old seats and building tiered platforms for dinner guests. Source: Jo Leonard.
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A final walk-through before demolition revealed the sad, dilapidated state of the building. It was beyond salvageable. Photo by Kevin Leonard.
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After the building was condemned, Jo Leonard climbed into the projectionist’s booth through this hatch leading to the roof to take a final look at her family’s dinner theater. Photo by Kevin Leonard.
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This was the final state of the building before demolition. Photo by Kevin Leonard.
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The balcony of the theater was exposed when demolition began. Photo by Richard Friend.

Here are the links to the story in the Laurel Leader. Come back when you’re finished reading!

Part 1:

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/howard/laurel/ph-ll-history-theater-0707-20160707-story.html

Part 2:

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/howard/laurel/ph-ll-history-theater2-0811-20160804-story.html

 

 

 

July 23, 2016

Summer of Love Music Festivals: Woodstock, Altamont, and Laurel?

pop-festival-1In July 1969, Laurel hosted a two-day pop festival at the race course, attended by 15,000 fans, that offered an incredible lineup of some of the biggest pop performers of the year, and ended in controversy. Three of the acts went on to play Woodstock the next month, and a fourth was scheduled, but they broke up right after the Laurel Pop Festival. In fact, seven performers or groups who played at Laurel are in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and two have received the Kennedy Center Honors.

The second night of the festival started late because of rain and as the night wore on, the soaked fans built a bonfire out of some wooden folding chairs to ward off the cold. The media reported that a “riot” closed down the festival and future plans to continue in Laurel were scrapped.

These two were very early arrivals. The race track is in the background. These are the wooden chairs that were burned.

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Source: e-rockworld.com

Local media, especially the Baltimore Sun, ran numerous articles reporting on the progress of the festival. Source: Baltimore Sun and Laurel News Leader.

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Source: Baltimore Sun and Laurel News Leader

The first night was kicked off by blues guitarist Buddy Guy, a Hall of Fame and Kennedy Center Honoree.

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He was followed by the gospel group the Edwin Hawkins Singers, who were enjoying huge success with their single “Oh, Happy Day.”

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The next act was Al Kooper, the ex-lead singer of Blood, Sweat & Tears.

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Jethro Tull, whose first album “Stand Up,” released a few months earlier, was the number 1 album in the UK, was next.

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They were followed by Johnny Winter, who would also perform the next month at Woodstock.

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Finishing the first night’s set was the headliner, Led Zeppelin. Led Zeppelin was in the midst of their first world-wide tour, and had been the opening act for The Who a month earlier at Merriweather Post Pavilion. Led Zeppelin, a Hall of Fame group, was also a Kennedy Center Honoree.

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Led Zeppelin’s official web site has a page devoted to their performance at the Laurel Pop Festival.

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Source: ledzeppelin.com
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Source: ledzeppelin.com

The power cut off Led Zeppelin in mid-song but Robert Plant kept singing until the power was restored.

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Source: ledzeppelin.com

Fans on the second night had to wait out a rain delay. At 10:00 p.m., the Jeff Beck Group, with Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood, took the stage. The Jeff Beck Group was on their fifth U.S. tour and scheduled to play at Woodstock, but the band broke up shortly after their performance at Laurel and cancelled. The Jeff Beck Group, Stewart, and Wood are all in the Hall of Fame.

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The next act was Ten Years After, another Woodstock performer.

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They were followed by The Guess Who, riding a huge popularity wave with their #1 single, “These Eyes.”

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Next up was the Mothers of Invention with Frank Zappa, another Hall of Famer. The Washington Post’s review of the festival said “Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention kept their freak show to a minimum (which is still hilarious) and concentrated on music-making that combines great rock, classical influences, jazz brass, and 12-tone dynamics into beautiful sound.”

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Sly and the Family Stone, another Hall of Fame group and Woodstock performer, took the stage and brought the house down. They started their set at 2 a.m. and had people up dancing. But things went downhill as Sly’s performance continued. The bonfires were started on the infield, and promoters issued several warnings to the crowd, to no avail.

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Because of the commotion on the infield and the rain delay, the Savoy Brown Band did not perform.

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Bruce Remer, who hosts the web site BR’s Classic Rock Photos was a high school student attending the Laurel Pop Festival. There are stories on his web site from attendees describing how they wandered backstage, with no security in sight, and mingled with the performers. Remer and his friend Tom Beech snapped away with Kodak Instamatics backstage.

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Here is the link to the story in the Laurel Leader. Come back when you’re finished reading!

http://www.baltimoresun.com/ph-ll-history-festival-1227-20121229-story.html

FEBRUARY 9, 2016

Laurel’s Forgotten Role in the Bonus Army


bonus army

I spend a lot of time doing historical research for clients at the National Archives. Sometimes I use students as research assistants, including my sons. That was the situation early in 2014, when my son Jeff was helping me with a project that had no connection to my History Matters column.

Jeff found a reference to Laurel in an index of Universal newsreels that date back to the 1920s. The reference concerned the Bonus Army of 1932. Coincidentally, I had recently read the excellent book “The Bonus Army” by Paul Dickson and Thomas B. Allen, so I was well acquainted with the topic but amazed that Laurel had played a role. Laurel was not mentioned in the book.

The shameful story began in 1924 when World War I veterans were promised a service bonus, most of which were to be paid 21 years later in 1945! Once the Great Depression hit, thousands of destitute and homeless veterans marched on Washington to demand the promised bonus for their service to the country. President Herbert Hoover, aided by J. Edgar Hoover, smeared the veterans’ cause by claiming it was organized by Communists.

When that classy (and untrue) move didn’t deter the veterans, President Hoover then called out the military, led by Chief of Staff General Douglas MacArthur and then-Major George Patton. The unarmed U.S. Army veterans were pushed by horses, bayonets, and tear gas back on Pennsylvania Ave over the 11th St. Bridge to their cardboard and ramshackle dwellings, which were burned to the ground under MacArthur’s orders.

Most of the veterans went home after that, but many wanted to stay and push for the cause. A woman from Catonsville offered them her land near Laurel to establish a permanent camp. The story reveals what happened next.

The article appeared in the Laurel Leader on March 13, 2014.

This video, from a 1932 Universal newsreel, shows veterans leaving Washington, DC and arriving at the Laurel camp, which was still being organized. Source: National Archives and Records Administration.

This video, also from a Universal newsreel, has footage of MacArthur’s troops and Patton’s tanks pushing the veterans down Pennsylvania Ave. It also shows the U.S. Army using tear gas on the unarmed WWI veterans, and their camp being burned down under MacArthur’s orders. Source: National Archives and Records Administration.

This video has more footage of the Bonus Army in Washington and then the veterans fleeing the tear gas fired by the military. Source: National Archives and Records Administration.

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Source: Newspapers.com
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Source: Newspapers.com
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Source: Maryland Historical Society
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Source: Maryland Historical Society
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Source: New York Times
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Source: New York Times
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Source: Laurel News Leader
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Source: Laurel News Leader
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This is the index listing my son found that started the search for the story. Source: National Archives and Records Administration

Here is the link to the story in the Laurel Leader. Come back when you’re finished reading!

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/howard/laurel/ph-ll-history-bonus-army-20140313-story.html

NOVEMBER 10, 2015

Laurel’s Billy the Kid

BANK-BANDIT-PRINTI came across a Baltimore Sun article from 1911 that was an extraordinarily detailed account of a failed bank robbery in Laurel. Just writing about someone trying to rob the Citizen’s National Bank on Main Street in 1911 would have been fun, but the details in the Sun made it an irresistible story to me. The story contained many Laurel characters of the day (some of whom I’d heard of), as well as an interesting twist as to who the bank robber actually was.

My son, Jeff, served as my research assistant and photographer for this one. We interviewed Bernie Robinson, the current manager of the bank (now PNC Bank), who gave us an extended tour of the bank, especially the original structure from 1890 that is completely absorbed into today’s bank. We also talked to Jim McCeney, Ken Skrivseth, and Karen Lubieniecki, downtown residents who provided valuable information on the neighborhood where the robber fled. When Ken showed us the alley that runs between Main and Prince George Streets, the Kid’s path while running for his life became obvious.

The column ran in the Laurel Leader on Jan. 31, 2013.

The Kid was guarded by Constable Valentine Kaiser until a Baltimore detective arrived to interrogate the prisoner. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
The Kid was guarded by Constable Valentine Kaiser until a Baltimore detective arrived to interrogate the prisoner. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
The Kid turned out to be 17-year-old John R. Morgan from a town in Virginia near Roanoke. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
The Kid turned out to be 17-year-old John R. Morgan from a town in Virginia near Roanoke. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
In 1911, the Citizen’s National Bank of Laurel was a tiny brick building on the corner of Main and Fourth Streets. The original structure has been expanded many times. The bank was built in 1890 for approximately $7,000, half of which was the cost of the vault. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
In 1911, the Citizen’s National Bank of Laurel was a tiny brick building on the corner of Main and Fourth Streets. The original structure has been expanded many times. The bank was built in 1890 for approximately $7,000, half of which was the cost of the vault. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Bank Manager Bernie Robinson gave us a tour and showed off the bank’s original vault. Photo by Jeffrey Leonard.
Bank Manager Bernie Robinson gave us a tour and showed off the bank’s original vault. Photo by Jeffrey Leonard.
With information provided by residents, we were able to track the Kid’s flight from justice using Google Earth. In 1911, however, more than half of these houses were not built yet. Illustration by Kevin Leonard.
With information provided by residents, we were able to track the Kid’s flight from justice using Google Earth. In 1911, however, more than half of these houses were not built yet. Illustration by Kevin Leonard.
Charles H. Stanley, Sr., the bank’s first President. He helped interrogate the bank robber and later asked the court for clemency for the Kid. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Charles H. Stanley, Sr., the bank’s first President. He helped interrogate the bank robber and later asked the court for clemency for the Kid. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
George P. McCeney, Laurel’s Magistrate. He also helped interrogate Morgan and remanded him to Upper Marlboro to face a grand jury. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
George P. McCeney, Laurel’s Magistrate. He also helped interrogate Morgan and remanded him to Upper Marlboro to face a grand jury. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Cashier George W. Waters, who fired a shot into the ceiling before taking a shot at the robber. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Cashier George W. Waters, who fired a shot into the ceiling before taking a shot at the robber. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
The Executive Board of the bank, meeting a month after the attempted robbery, voted to confiscate Mr. Waters’ pistol for shooting a hole in the ceiling. On our tour of the bank, Bernie Robinson moved some drop ceiling tiles to reveal the original ceiling. We couldn’t see the bullet hole. Photo by Jeffrey Leonard.
The Executive Board of the bank, meeting a month after the attempted robbery, voted to confiscate Mr. Waters’ pistol for shooting a hole in the ceiling. On our tour of the bank, Bernie Robinson moved some drop ceiling tiles to reveal the original ceiling. We couldn’t see the bullet hole. Photo by Jeffrey Leonard.

Here is the link to the story in the Laurel Leader:

http://www.baltimoresun.com/explore/howard/news/community/ph-ll-history-bank-0131-20130130-story.html

A nice epilogue to the story was written by Prince George’s County Circuit Judge C. Philip Nichols Jr., a Laurel native, who followed the story with great interest. Nichols did some research to find out what happened to the Kid. Here’s his contribution:

http://www.baltimoresun.com/explore/howard/opinion-talk/ph-ll-column-nichols-0214-20130207-story.html

OCTOBER 31, 2015

Investigation Files of the George Wallace Shooting

wallace1-smallAfter filing a Freedom of Information Act request, I waited over a year for the National Archives to release the FBI’s files concerning the attempted assassination of Presidential candidate Alabama Governor George Wallace at the Laurel Shopping Center in May, 1972. I was curious if the files would contain anything that hadn’t already been reported many times over the years. I’m still waiting.

So I went to Plan B and contacted the Prince George’s County Police Department to see if they had any files. To my delight I was put in contact with Lt. Shawné Waddy, Assistant Commander of the PG Police Records Management Division, who was outstanding in supporting my request. Together with Technican Justin Blalock, they provided enough files and photos to fill a Xerox box.

Like everyone else in Laurel I followed the coverage of the shooting and the subsequent trial closely, as well as all the articles over the years since. But I was amazed at how much information was contained in the files that was new to me. It took me a few weeks to go through all of the interviews with eyewitnesses, police, Secret Service agents, and medical personnel, along with investigation reports and photos. Owing to the quantity of information in the investigative files, this was the longest “History Matters” I’ve written, and one of the most widely read. The article appeared in the Laurel Leader on July 9, 2015.

The site of the shooting is cordoned off by police. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
The site of the shooting is cordoned off by police. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Arthur Bremer’s car was found in the parking lot of the Laurel Shopping Center near People’s Drug Store. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Arthur Bremer’s car was found in the parking lot of the Laurel Shopping Center near People’s Drug Store. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Wallace appeared before a hostile crowd earlier in the day at Wheaton Plaza. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Wallace appeared before a hostile crowd earlier in the day at Wheaton Plaza. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
The protesters at Wheaton Plaza made no secret of their feelings about Wallace. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
The protesters at Wheaton Plaza made no secret of their feelings about Wallace. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
PG County Police produced this drawing after the fact of the shooting scene. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
PG County Police produced this drawing after the fact of the shooting scene. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
It’s hard to see, but Bremer’s gun had a Happy Face sticker affixed to the butt of the handle. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
It’s hard to see, but Bremer’s gun had a Happy Face sticker affixed to the butt of the handle. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
This was obviously the biggest news story in Laurel’s history. Source: Laurel News Leader.
This was obviously the biggest news story in Laurel’s history. Source: Laurel News Leader.
Many of the police and Secret Service agents interviewed were worried about the number of “hippies” in attendance. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Many of the police and Secret Service agents interviewed were worried about the number of “hippies” in attendance. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Apparently Bremer scouted Suburban Airport on Brock Bridge Road thinking that Wallace would arrive there by airplane. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Apparently Bremer scouted Suburban Airport on Brock Bridge Road thinking that Wallace would arrive there by airplane. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 1 of the report filed by the PG County detectives who took custody of Bremer after his arrest. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 1 of the report filed by the PG County detectives who took custody of Bremer after his arrest. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 2 of the report filed by the PG County detectives who took custody of Bremer after his arrest. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 2 of the report filed by the PG County detectives who took custody of Bremer after his arrest. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 1 of the interview report by detectives with Arthur Bremer’s mother. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 1 of the interview report by detectives with Arthur Bremer’s mother. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 2 of the interview report by detectives with Arthur Bremer’s mother. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 2 of the interview report by detectives with Arthur Bremer’s mother. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 2 of the interview report by detectives with Arthur Bremer’s mother. Source: Prince George’s County Police.The 2nd interview report by detectives with Arthur Bremer’s mother. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
The 2nd interview report by detectives with Arthur Bremer’s mother. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 1 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 1 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 2 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 2 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 3 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 3 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 4 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 4 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 5 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 5 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 6 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Page 6 of the interview report by detectives with a 16-year-old girl who dated Arthur Bremer. This was the most informative report as to Bremer’s mental condition in the whole file. Source: Prince George’s County Police.
Source: Baltimore Sun.
Source: Baltimore Sun.
Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Source: Bill Russell.
Source: Bill Russell.

Here is the link to the story in the Laurel Leader. Come back when you’re finished reading!

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/howard/laurel/ph-ll-history-wallace-20150709-story.html

OCTOBER 16, 2015

Laurel Sanitarium

sanitarium1-small

The one Laurel landmark that seems to generate the most interest is the long-ago demolished Laurel Sanitarium. There’s much information on the Internet about it, but as my research discovered, a whole lot of myths and tall tales passing for truth. The true story of the sanitarium is so bizarre it doesn’t need embellishment. The column ran in the Laurel Leader on July 10, 2014.

Dr. Coggins’ sanitarium car and driver. I found this after the column appeared. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Dr. Coggins’ sanitarium car and driver. I found this after the column appeared. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
The Brewster Park Hotel, which was moved to the sanitarium grounds and became a dormitory. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
The Brewster Park Hotel, which was moved to the sanitarium grounds and became a dormitory. Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Source: Baltimore Sun archives.
Source: Baltimore Sun archives.
Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Source: Laurel Historical Society.
This article appeared in the Washington Post on Jan. 14, 1907. Source: Washington Post archives.
This article appeared in the Washington Post on Jan. 14, 1907. Source: Washington Post archives.
This photo shows a typical hydrotheraphy session, similar to what was performed at the Laurel Sanitarium. Source: Life Magazine archives.
This photo shows a typical hydrotheraphy session, similar to what was performed at the Laurel Sanitarium. Source: Life Magazine archives.
This aerial photo shows the sanitarium in relation to the Laurel Shopping Center. Source: The Berman Collection.
This aerial photo shows the sanitarium in relation to the Laurel Shopping Center. Source: The Berman Collection.
Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Source: Laurel News Leader.
Source: Laurel News Leader.
Source: Lost Laurel.
Source: Lost Laurel.
Dr. Coggins and his second wife. Source: Laurel News Leader.
Dr. Coggins and his second wife. Source: Laurel News Leader.
Source: Laurel News Leader.
Source: Laurel News Leader.
Source: Peter and Martha (Kalbach) Lewnes collection.
Source: Peter and Martha (Kalbach) Lewnes collection.
Source: Laurel Historical Society.
Source: Laurel Historical Society.
This article appeared in the Baltimore Sun on April 22, 1909. Source: Baltimore Sun archives.
This article appeared in the Baltimore Sun on April 22, 1909. Source: Baltimore Sun archives.
This article appeared in the Baltimore Sun on June 22, 1917. Source: Baltimore Sun archives.
This article appeared in the Baltimore Sun on June 22, 1917. Source: Baltimore Sun archives.

Again, here is the link to the story in the Laurel Leader. Come back when you’re finished reading!